Sustainable Culture & Practice

Since the industrial revolution, consumer consumption has been a driving force within the global economy; but today the vast amounts of materials and energy used to supply the markets is leading us beyond safe planetary boundaries. We question the net benefit of some existing practices and propose system interventions that can contribute to the emergence of truly sustainable societies.

With climate change now internationally recognised and emission reduction targets set, no area of human activity is off limits for scrutiny, and as such members of this year's cohort have chosen quite different topics to give attention to. They include; the chinese beauty products market, waste within the consumer fashion industry and the environmental, health and social impact of the we as a society toilet train our children.

The TO-MORROW Plan Yiwen Qu and Yizhou Yang have been working with L’Oreal China to create a more environmentally friendly beauty products market. The TO-MORROW plan establishes a compelling narrative to help shift employee attitudes in a more environmentally friendly direction whilst also offering comprehensive incentives and transparent information to cultivate more sustainable consumption habits and demands from customers. The vision is a virtuous circle of sustainability in the Chinese beauty market.

RE:UP by Najung Kim RE:UP is a platform for consumers, independent fashion brands, and individual fashion designers to become a part of the circular fashion economy, through sharing environmental information. This aims to reduce the wastes from the fashion industry and businesses. Also it aims to encourage consumers to consume more consciously.

Stepping Stones by Peter Williams The age at which we as a society are toilet training our children has been rising, and this is having a negative impact on how easy the task is to complete. It is also associated with higher risks of continence issues for school age children which can lead to psychosocial problems into adolescence. Further to this, later toilet training means higher volumes of waste and CO2 emissions. Reusables reduce physical waste but the extra washing generates just as much emissions. Stepping Stones is a service to teach a toilet training method inspired by the practices of indigenous peoples from around the world. It helps infants to develop continence before their first birthday. It is beneficial to child health, and the environment. It has the potential to save families money through reduced nappy usage. It could also save council and health services money via reduced waste management and health treatment costs.

Sustainable Culture & Practice

 PROJECTS

STUDENTS WORKING IN THIS THEME

Building Resilience
Reimagining Agency
Design for Equity
Responsible Data
New Business
Reimagining Agency
Building Resilience
Building Resilience
Cultural Systems
Building Resilience
Sustainable Culture & Practice
Building Resilience
Design for Equity
Building Resilience
Design for Equity
Building Resilience
Sustainable Culture & Practice
Building Resilience
Building Resilience
Design for Equity
Sustainable Culture & Practice
Building Resilience
Sustainable Culture & Practice
Design for Equity
Design for Equity
Design for Equity
Reimagining Agency
Building Resilience